Books as Windows and Mirrors

Windows MirrorsA friend of mine introduced me to the idea of books as windows and mirrors. She introduces the idea to her students at the beginning of the school year as a way of discussing book selection.

A book that serves as a mirror is one that we see ourself in. These kinds of books can help us get a better understanding of who we are, what we value, and how we navigate the world.

For me, a mirror book would be about a white girl who loves books and words. A recent read that was a mirror book for me was A Northern Light by Jennifer Donnelly. While reading that book, I posted something about how the book was “speaking to my heart” because the main character resonated so powerfully with how I see the world.

A book that is window allows you to view a world outside your own. These books are the kind that let you step into another person’s shoes, however briefly, and see the world as they see it. These books promote empathy and understanding for people and situations outside our own experience.

For me, a recent window book was The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas. This book allowed me to see and understand the world from a black teen’s perspective. The book gave me empathy and understanding for all that a black teen might be dealing with, from code-switching, to police brutality, to interracial relationships, and more.

As you set reading goals for the new year, I encourage you to think of books as windows and mirrors. We need mirror books to become more self-aware and understand ourselves.

But we also need window books. Oh boy, do we need window books. We need to push ourselves to better understand other perspectives. With the understanding and empathy that window books provide, perhaps we can create a world with more love, more peace, and more kindness.

And if you want to watch a great video on the power of reading and empathy, check out this gem from the channel Just Write:

Series Review: The Selection (Part Two)

Selection Series2

The Heir (#4)
The Crown (#5)
by Kiera Cass
Published by: HarperTeen
Form: Audiobook
Big Themes: Falling in Love, Identity, Royalty, Competition, Reality TV

Summary from Goodreads (Book Four): Princess Eadlyn has grown up hearing endless stories about how her mother and father met. Eadlyn has always found their fairy-tale story romantic, but she has no interest in trying to repeat it. If it were up to her, she’d put off marriage for as long as possible.

But a princess’s life is never entirely her own, and Eadlyn can’t escape her very own Selection—no matter how fervently she protests.

Eadlyn doesn’t expect her story to end in romance. But as the competition begins, one entry may just capture Eadlyn’s heart, showing her all the possibilities that lie in front of her . . . and proving that finding her own happily ever after isn’t as impossible as she’s always thought.

Review:
Eadlyn is not as likable a character as her mother, America, was in books one through three. She is spoiled, self-centered, narrow-minded, and determined. Not all those traits are negative. But it’s the way she treats others that really made me dislike her. She does some callous things that will make you cringe during the Selection process. Eadlyn does grow and change over the course of both books, and makes some wonderful, redeeming choices in the end.

The book has some great positive messages for girls. Both books examine double standards of women in leadership positions. And I wonder whether part of Eadlyn being an unlikable character stems from her being not a traditional, submissive female figure.

Overall, I didn’t enjoy these two books as much as the first three, but I’m still glad I listened to them!

Overall:
The first three books in this series are more fun. Eadlyn’s story is tough to get through at times because of her unlikable nature, but there are great feminist messages for girls who want to be leaders someday. Three stars.

Return to Blogging 2017

It has been over two years since I’ve posted, but I’ve missed blogging! I took a break for many reasons: completing my MFA, enjoying the beginning honeymoon stage of my relationship with my boyfriend, and moving homes/jobs.

Screen Shot 2017-10-04 at 2.54.41 PM

Ready to write!

But I realized that blogging helped me in two ways connected to productivity: getting my butt in the chair writing and giving me reading goals to work towards.

Having a writing schedule has always been the best way for me to produce new writing. While I want to be a fiction writer, not a full-time blogger, the act of producing blog posts helps me create a writing rhythm that my fiction writing benefits from as well.

I’m sure I’m not alone in saying that time management has only gotten more difficult in the time of social media. It is so easy to get sucked down a hole of distractions for an hour at a time.

It may seem contradictory to say that publishing posts online could then improve productivity! But I found that setting reading/reviewing deadlines and participating more in the online book world led to dedicating more time for reading as a whole.

Overall, having a blogging platform and the structure of regular posting increased my productivity as both a reader and writer. The one thing I have to keep aware of is not allowing my blogging writing to overwhelm my creative writing. Because ultimately, my end goal is to be a fiction writer not a book blogger.  🙂

The month of December:
Will feature reviews of all the books I read this year. Get ready to put some fabulous books on your to-read list!